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Youth Activism Necessary for HIV/AIDS Prevention

Youth Activism Necessary for HIV/AIDS Prevention

1 in 5…. 1 in 5 people in the United States have HIV and do not know their status. AIDS is now the 3rd leading cause of death among black women ages 35-44 and currently 1 in 110 people in the world is infected with HIV.
An article on AIDS Prevention through youth activism by Jonathan Baston

HIV Awareness and Prevention

HIV Awareness and Prevention

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a virus that only affects humans. Unlike other viruses, it attacks your immune system over time. HIV attacks and destroys the T-Cells or CD-4 cells your body needs to fight infections and uses these cells to reproduce itself. Over time, when there are a minimal number of T-Cells or CD-4 cells in your body, HIV progresses to AIDS.

U.S.M.L.E. Telephone Mentoring

As a humble physician-author-educator it has been my honor to be invited to speak to our Student National Medical Association (SNMA) in Johnson City. Therefore, it is with humility and respect that I dedicate this: my meager and imperfect paper to our local (SNMA).

‘Ayiti, Cheri Mwen’: A Brief Account of Our Medical Missions Trip to Haiti

‘Ayiti, Cheri Mwen’: A Brief Account of Our Medical Missions Trip to Haiti

The thought, planning, and the actual accounts of my recent medical mission trip to Haiti offered a remarkable experience. I selected key points during this whole humbling process in order to give you a glimpse of our trip to Haiti.

Study Indicates Targeted Strategies Needed to Find, Prevent and Treat Breast Cancer among Mexican-Origin Women

Specific prevention and education strategies are needed to address breast cancer in Mexican-origin women in this country, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, which was published online in the journal.

Dr. Edward Cornwell

Violence Prevention in a Clinical Setting

At the June 2010 SNMA National Leadership Institute the keynote speaker, Dr. Edward Cornwell III, suggested that violence be considered as the top public health issue. Traditionally, public health is thought of in terms of obesity, cancer prevention and environmental health. However, the scope of modern public health has far exceeded its early beginnings of water sanitation, waste removal and vaccinations.

 I Am SNMA: Sister Anne Brooks, D.O.

I Am SNMA: Sister Anne Brooks, D.O.

Diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at seventeen years of age, Sister Anne Brooks D.O. was told that she would be confined to a sedentary life of pain, and back braces. She spent the next seventeen years as a wheelchair bound teacher and was put on several medications and admitted into an arthritic hospital. After refusing to accept her debilitating condition, she signed up to volunteer at a free clinic in Florida, and it was there that she met John Upledger, D.O. He offered her acupuncture treatments, helped her change her diet, and referred her to an osteopathic neurosurgeon who would perform a procedure called manipulation under anesthesia. It is because of the help of Dr. Upledger that she has been able to live successfully with rheumatoid arthritis and maintain a normal lifestyle, pain free! Several years later, his impact in her life would inspire her to become a physician as well. “Osteopathic Medicine offered more alternatives in treating that proved very helpful for me.” said Sister Anne. Now 72 years old, Sister Anne, is a graduate of Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine where she obtained her doctorate at the age of 44. However, before she decided to attend medical school, she wanted to make sure that she was pursuing medicine with the correct intentions.

I AM SNMA: Lisa F. Waddell, M.D., M.P.H.

I AM SNMA: Lisa F. Waddell, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Lisa F. Waddell is the first African American and the first woman to hold the position of Deputy Commissioner for Health Services for the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). A preventive medicine and public health board certified physician, Dr. Waddell received her undergraduate degree from the University of Virginia, her medical degree from the Medical College of Virginia (currently known as Virginia Commonwealth University), and her Master of Public Health Degree with a concentration in Health Policy and Administration from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health. She also participated in the Centers for Disease Control National Public Health Leadership Institute.

Boston Tea Party Remixed: The Implications of Taxing Sugar-Sweetened Beverages

Boston Tea Party Remixed: The Implications of Taxing Sugar-Sweetened Beverages

It was a cold December night in 1773. The British had proposed a tax on tea and the colonists were outraged. Taxes, which were viewed by the British as a means of revenue, had become symbols of oppression to the colonists. As such, the Tea Tax Act became a tipping point that culminated in the Revolutionary War. When three large ships loaded with imported British tea arrived on the docks in Boston, outraged citizens dumped the ships’ cargo into the harbor in protest – an event that became known as the Boston Tea Party.

Preventive Medicine: A Look at Residency Programs as a Career Pathway

There has long been an awareness of the role of prevention in improving health and health care in our country. In fact, many of the leading causes of death in this country are due to preventable diseases. Thus, it is important for the field of medicine to be a part of the prevention as well as the treatment of disease. Accordingly, The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM), established in 1948, works to certify qualified physicians with specific knowledge of preventive medicine and to enhance standards of practice within preventive medicine. Though preventive medicine seems somewhat self-explanatory in its title, the depth and variety of clinical practice within the field merits further elucidation.