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Multidisciplinary initiatives to tackle racial bias: Reflections from Uc San Diego, School of Medicine

Multidisciplinary initiatives to tackle racial bias: Reflections from Uc San Diego, School of Medicine

By: Naeemah Munir, MPH; Kelechi Anudokem, MPH; Nadine Patton, MAS; Nicole Tantoco, MPH 1University of California, San Diego School of Medicine Program in Medical Education – Health Equity Through this reflection of our experiences at University of California San Diego, School of Medicine (UCSD SoM), we will discuss the importance of underrepresented in medicine (URiM) […]

Axiology and racial bias in medicine:  A discussion of utilitarianism and moral desert

Axiology and racial bias in medicine: A discussion of utilitarianism and moral desert

By: Arham Siddiqui Baylor University The growth of equality and civil rights is evident in modern society through historical events from The Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and 1960s to the Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Policy established in 2012. However, racial bias remains a pressing issue, especially in the field of medicine. A […]

Air Force, Army and Navy Health Professions Scholarships

Air Force, Army and Navy Health Professions Scholarships are available.

What Medical Students Should Know About Fatigue, Patient Safety and Resident Wellness

No question about it—becoming a doctor has always been arduous. It takes years of mentally and physically demanding training to learn the science and art of medicine. But a growing body of scientific evidence now points to the link between the extremely long hours that many resident physicians are required to work and an increased risk of preventable medical errors.

A Guide for Pre-Med Students Considering a Career in Preventive Medicine

If you are like most pre-medical students, you may not have decided upon the specialty area that you plan to pursue. As you explore your options, be sure to consider preventive medicine as a career choice. A career in preventive medicine may provide you with an opportunity to work in a variety of areas including: public health, research, public policy and the military.

Business as Usual

Last night, my first patient died. Well, she was the first patient that died whom I was actually following. Sure, I have recollections of the late 20-something years-old guy who came to the trauma bay at Baystate dead on arrival from a gunshot wound to the head. I remember his brother, another casualty of the night, coming in just after him, occupying the same place in the trauma bay on a different stretcher asking, no, pleading with us to tell him where his brother was. No one wanted to break the news that his beloved brother was zipped up in a bag, with his body still on the stretcher just next door where the curtain was drawn. However, in the midst of this tragic family drama, life in the emergency room continued.

Third Grade and the New Me

New freshly pressed clothes, new woodened desks, new unopened books, new kind teacher, new school, and a few new friends were all I was greeted with on my first day of third grade. A few days into this excitingly new environment, I contracted the chicken pox virus and was enjoying a few days at home, watching television and trying not to scratch. One night, while trying to walk to the bathroom, I stumbled and fell. The world was spinning and I did not know why. I called out to my parents for help. My father came quickly and carried me into my parents’ room. I had a fever of 101oF. My mother gave me Tylenol and drove me to the city hospital. Soon after I was admitted, I rapidly slipped into a coma.