Plasmonic nanosensors developed for sophisticated HIV detection test

Two researchers from the Imperial College London, United Kingdom have succeeded in developing and testing a state-of-the-art HIV detection test. The duo says the test is 10 times more sensitive than other methods used to identify this disease, and it is inexpensive. The potential to bring this innovative technique to market is strong, providing a way to diagnose HIV earlier. The findings were published in the journal Nature Materials (“Plasmonic nanosensors with inverse sensitivity by means of enzyme-guided crystal growth”).
 
Professor Molly Stevens and Dr Roberto de la Rica, who received a EUR 1.6 million European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant and a EUR 212,000 Intra-European, Marie Curie Actions fellowship, respectively, looked for an HIV protein, a molecule named antigen p24, which scientists used to detect HIV in newborns with a relative degree of success. Their latest findings are miles ahead of what other studies discovered in the past because of the nanotechnology techniques developed and used in their tests. Professor Stevens and Dr de la Rica evaluated 30 blood samples donated by St Mary’s Hospital in London and detected the disease in 10 patients; this would not have been possible if traditional techniques had been used.
 
Nanowerk News reports here.

Filed Under: AIDS AwarenessGlobal Health

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